4 Reasons to Give Up Hope

“Will you be able to follow through?”
“I hope so.”
 
“Will I get the shipment on time?”
“Here’s hoping!”
 
“Are you going to get that job?”
“That’s what I’m hoping for.”
So often, we are stuck counting on someone else to put their best foot forward, and we are left hoping they can accomplish the goal. If you look at the questions above, each answer tells you nothing about the likelihood of achieving any particular outcome. When you tell someone you’re hoping, you’re not offering a plan, an expectation, or even your personal conviction. What you’re doing is giving yourself the message that it’s out of your hands, and you have to accept whatever comes your way.
Here’s why you can do better without hope:
1. Hope is the big neutral. 
 
Even with a big dream that seems daunting for a single individual to impact (like peace on earth), you can do more than just hope. Don’t hope; set an intention. When I teach a yoga class, I start each practice by guiding students to set an intention. The idea is that we are dedicating the energy and effort of the practice toward a particular outcome. Big or small, it takes you one full actionable step beyond hope.
2. When you stop hoping, you can start doing. 
A friend of mine from the South has a saying that always makes me smile. When she’s ready to go but waiting on someone else, she says, “I’m sittin’ on green and ready to go!” Hope is like sitting on green and… just waiting. When you’re only hoping for an outcome, you are not moving any closer to the goal. You’re telling yourself that what you want is out of your control, and that there’s nothing you can do about it. You have to decide if your goal is worth some exertion. Even if the answer is “no,” you can take action by dropping it. If the answer is “yes,” you can take an action toward making it real.
3. Hoping stunts your growth.
We grow through challenge, pressure, making mistakes and starting again. Hope is a comfort zone that doesn’t include any of these. Each time we take action, even if it turns out to be in the wrong direction, we grow beyond who we were yesterday. Nature doesn’t let anything stand still. If it’s not moving, atrophy and degeneration sets in. Swap out hope for responsibility, and you continue to progress as an individual.
4. Eliminating hope from your verbiage will boost your self esteem.  
You cannot build confidence without achievement. Nothing feels better physically, emotionally or spiritually than making a commitment, having conviction and taking charge of your destiny. Telling yourself you are going to do whatever it takes feeds you a totally different energy than telling yourself you’re hoping. When you take control of attaining what you want, even if you fall short of the final objective, you amplify your sense of personal power.
What is one hope that you can turn into an intention today?
Originally posted on MindBodyGreen

5 Tips to Finish Your Year Strong

This article was originally posted on MindBodyGreen, I hope you enjoy it!
In football, the two-minute drill can be the most exciting part of the game. It’s in these last two minutes of the game that losing teams tap their steel and passion; and winning teams devise their best strategies to maintain their momentum. As we head toward the time of year when the kids go back to school and the seasons make another change, you have time to finish the year strong. Here’s your strategy to make the most of 2012’s two-minute drill.
1. Acknowledge. You’re not the same person you were in January and you are not yet the person you are going to be in December. Take a look at the goals, resolutions, or intentions you had in January. Make sure they are still a good fit for where your life is now, and where you are headed. Eliminate anything that you adopted to please someone else, or because you thought you should. The hardest goals to achieve are the one’s that were never really yours to begin with. Don’t hesitate to change course! I totally do not understand the social stigma associated with saying “I changed my mind”. To me, that statement means you’re thinking rather than blindly, numbingly staying the course.
2. Forgive yourself. In a two minute drill there’s no time for self- recrimination, or beating yourself up. Once you acknowledge where you are and what’s not working, you’re all about moving on. If your best friend approached you honestly and said, “I screwed up, can I get another chance?” more often than not you’d forgive and move on. If you haven’t made the progress you intended so far in 2012, admit to yourself that you screwed up, and then give yourself another shot.  No drama.
3. Stop sitting on green and get going. At this point in the year, stay fully cognizant of Isaac Newton’s wisdom: “An object at rest tends to stay at rest, an object in motion tends to stay in motion.” As you reassess your year’s goals, do not get frozen into a state of analysis paralysis. It’s often more productive to make a move, in any direction, even a wrong one. Once you’re moving, you can decide it’s not the right path for you, and then change accordingly. However, the longer you sit on green without moving in any direction, the harder it is to get going. With your list paired down to the objectives that really mean something to you, and having dropped the unneeded bag of guilt over what hasn’t worked, you can start to move forward with renewed conviction.
4. Make a promise – to yourself. You make promises to other people and bend over backward to stay true to your word. Unfortunately, you probably don’t give yourself the same consideration. When you make a promise to yourself that you will work on something, you are making a commitment. Your promise is a vow you won’t break. Your word to yourself needs to be as meaningful a binder as giving your commitment to someone else. You have things you want to change/accomplish/achieve this year. The clock is ticking. It’s time to make yourself a priority and put a laser focus on what you need.
5. Create boundaries around your health and well being that no one is allowed to cross. We don’t always have an instinct to stand up for ourselves and, when we do, we often feel bad about it. Creating personal boundaries can be the single most transformational action you take this year. Implementing this strategy often means making difficult choices and saying “no.” It’s important to be clear with yourself and others as to where your boundaries are, and to resist the temptation to defend or apologize for enforcing these guidelines. “I’d help you fix your PC for the fifth time this month, but I’m not taking on extra projects right now.”  “I agreed to organize that conference for you, but I realize I can’t give it the time it deserves, so I’ll find you someone else.” If you start to feel the guilt creep in, call it out for what it is. You’re feeling guilty about prioritizing your own well being! That’s not a good reason to change your strategy. Drop the guilt baggage on the side of the road. You are moving on to finish your year strong.
In Super Bowl XLII, the New York Giants executed a two-minute drill that resulted in the game winning touchdown against the New England Patriots. In 2 minutes and 7 seconds the Giants ran 12 plays, covered more than 80 yards (twice the norm), and finished strong securing the win. The steps in your 2012 two-minute drill may make you uneasy at first but as you begin to take care of yourself (for yourself), you will find a new sense of confidence in your ability to meet your challenges, and accomplish your objectives. You’ve got the playbook, it’s your year to finish strong.